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    Course Descriptions

    ARCH 100 - Introduction to Architecture
    Orientation to contemporary local architecture practice in the context of the history of architectural theory; examination of the changing role of the architect through history; introduction to the formal language and vocabulary of the discipline. Emphasis given to developing written and presentations skills. (2-1-3) (C) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 109 - Freehand Drawing I
    Drawing from still life, human figure, and architecture, both out-of-doors and in the studio; drawing from life in various media. (0-4-2) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 110 - Freehand Drawing II
    Drawing from still life, human figure, and architecture, both out-of-doors and in the studio; drawing from life in various media. (0-4-2) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 109 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 113 - Architecture Studio I
    Studio exercises to develop excellence in craftsmanship and visual sensitivity as a foundation for a basic architectural language. Problems of various lengths will deal with the technical skills of drawing and model-making materials and in both two and three dimensions. Using problems of both an abstract and an architectural character, this course will build verbal communication skills and model shop ability. (0-12-6) (C) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 114 - Architecture Studio II
    Studio exercises to develop excellence in craftsmanship and visual sensitivity as a foundation for a basic architectural language. Problems of various lengths will deal with the technical skills of drawing and model-making materials and in both two and three dimensions. Using problems of both an abstract and an architectural character, this course will build verbal communication skills and model shop ability. (0-12-6) (C) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 113 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 125 - Introduction to Architectural Computing
    The class introduces concept development, design thinking and problem solving related to architectural representation and production technique (digital and analog). The class will look critically at recent digital design developments, as well as introduce students to the history of each "type" of computer program; and the class will introduce students to the basic skills required to productively work with a variety of practice-based software programs. The class will also introduce 3D "craft-based" thinking/working. (1-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 201 - Architecture III: Structures, Building Systems, and Assemblies
    The development of architectural principles through the study and analysis of building materials. Development of the graphic language in architecture. Consideration of the appropriate use of materials, energy, and clear construction as the basis of architecture. (0-10-5) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 113 with min. grade of D and ARCH 114 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 202 - Architecture IV: Structures, Building Systems, and Assemblies
    The development of architectural principles through the study and analysis of building materials. Development of the graphic language in architecture. Consideration of the appropriate use of materials, energy, and clear construction as the basis of architecture. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 113 with min. grade of D, ARCH 114 with min. grade of D, and ARCH 201 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 226 - Architectural Computing
    Review of drafting, modeling and rendering computer hardware and software used in the practice of architecture design. Design and management issues are explored with the extensive use of PC CAD systems, including AutoCAD. Contemporary practice applications are discussed. (2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 125 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 230 - Structure and Architecture
    The theory and concepts of structures are presented with a visual format and models to emphasize an intuitive comprehension of the fundamental principles of structural behavior including loading, shear and bending moments. Architectural examples of integrated structures then become format to introduce an understanding of materials and the design process to quantify the engineering. Masonry load-bearing walls and the arch are used as the initial examples to correlate intuition and engineering calculations. (3-0-3) (N) Prerequisite: [(PHYS 123 with min. grade of D) OR (PHYS 200 with min. grade of D) OR (PHYS 211 with min. grade of D and PHYS 212 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 305 - Architecture V
    Continued development of architectural principles of ARCH 201 and 202 through the correlation of design process and building systems. Consideration of the interrelation of building, programming, site planning, structure, enclosure systems, energy consumption, and environmental control systems, and the cultural concepts supporting their organization. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 201 with min. grade of D, ARCH 202 with min. grade of D, and ARCH 230 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 306 - Architecture VI
    Continued development of architectural principles of ARCH 201 and 202 through the correlation of design process and building systems. Consideration of the interrelation of building, programming, site planning, structure, enclosure systems, energy consumption, and environmental control systems, and the cultural concepts supporting their organization. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 201 with min. grade of D, ARCH 202 with min. grade of D, ARCH 230 with min. grade of D, and ARCH 305 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 321 - Contemporary Architecture
    This course investigates the state of contemporary architecture as represented by significant practices, buildings, theories, and criticisms. Themes to be considered include globalization, the role of digital design media, the ethics and aesthetics of sustainability, contemporary urbanism, new approaches to materials and structure, and recent interests in ornament and pattern-making. Current conditions will be related historically to postwar reactions to modernism and contextually to the social and technological shifts of recent decades. (3-0-3) (C) Prerequisite: [(AAH 119 with min. grade of D and AAH 120 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 331 - Visual Training I
    Aesthetic expression as experience. Exercises in the study of form: proportion and rhythm, texture and color, mass and space. Exercises in visual perception and aesthetic judgment. Isolation and analysis; interdependence and integration of sensuous qualities. Aesthetic unity under restrictive conditions. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 332 - Visual Training II
    Aesthetic expression as experience. Exercises in the study of form: proportion and rhythm, texture and color, mass and space. Exercises in visual perception and aesthetic judgment. Isolation and analysis; interdependence and integration of sensuous qualities. Aesthetic unity under restrictive conditions. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 331 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 333 - Visual Training III
    Spatial studies with planes and volumes of various materials. Aesthetic expression as experience. Exercises in the study of form: proportion and rhythm, texture and color, mass and space. Exercises in visual perception and aesthetic judgment. Isolation and analysis; interdependence and integration of sensuous qualities. Aesthetic unity under restrictive conditions. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 331 with min. grade of D and ARCH 332 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 334 - Frame Structural Systems and Steel
    Based on a statics and strength of materials, analysis of tension, compression and bending, timber and steel members are designed into truss or column and beam structural systems. Connections and sheer walls are studied as the transfer of moments to resolve dynamic loads in multiple frames. This engineering knowledge is then directly integrated into the parallel studio experience of developing an architectural project that focuses on steel as the structural material. (3-0-3) (N) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 230 with min. grade of D and PHYS 200 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 335 - Reinforced Concrete and Continuous Structure
    The plastic qualities of reinforced concrete are studied as an internal distribution of forces based on the continuity of the material. These same principles also apply to all dome, cable and membrane structures. Complete structural systems of concrete are developed with footings, columns, shear walls, and horizontal plate options. More advanced applications include tension systems and thin shell construction. These engineering experiences are then integrated into the practice of designing an architectural studio project based on reinforced concrete as the structural material. (3-0-3) (N) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 230 with min. grade of D, ARCH 334 with min. grade of D, and PHYS 200 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 403 - Mechanical and Electrical Building Systems for Architects I
    Selection and design of building support systems: heating, ventilating, air conditioning, water supply, sanitary and storm drainage, power distribution, lighting, communications and vertical transportation. Systems are analyzed for their effect on building form, construction cost and operating efficiency. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 201 with min. grade of D and ARCH 202 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 404 - Mechanical and Electrical Building Systems for Architects II
    Selection and design of building support systems: heating, ventilating, air conditioning, water supply, sanitary and storm drainage, power distribution, lighting, communications, and vertical transportation. Systems are analyzed for their effect on building form, construction cost and operating efficiency. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 403 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 408 - Freehand Drawing
    A multi-purpose drawing course offering students a chance to develop on-site sketching skills and creative expression in drawing through a combination of sketching field trips and in-class drawing assignments. (0-3-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 409 - Advanced Freehand Drawing
    Advanced development of freehand drawing skills in various mediums; still life, human figure, the natural and built environment, studio and field settings. (0-3-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 408 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 410 - Architectural Freehand Rendering
    The course explores freehand sketching, perspective drawing, and the art of analytical drawing as a means of conveying architectural spatial ideas. Architects must have competence in expressing thought through hand sketching using both fundamental and complex techniques to get an idea across to the viewer. The most successful architectural drawings express the pure concept of space and have a clear complexity of thought. This course teaches several freehand drawing techniques and media including pencil, pen, pastel, and watercolor media utilizing group and individual instruction. Requirements include a journal sketchbook, field sketches, and finished renderings. Drawing excursions in Chicago and surrounding areas. (2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 109 with min. grade of D and ARCH 110 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 413 - Architectural Practice
    Lectures and practical problems dealing with specifications, specification writing, administration of construction, contracts, building law and professional practice. (3-0-3) (C) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 414 - Professional Practice: Building Case Studies
    Case study analysis of buildings, including the design process, building detailing, construction methods, government regulation, owner satisfaction, and post-construction forensics. (3-0-3) (C) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 417 - Architecture VII
    Structure as an architectural factor; space as an architectural problem; proportion as a means of architectural expression; the expressive value of materials; painting and sculpture in their relationship to architecture. Application of principles in comprehensive projects involving program, site, and code analysis. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 230 with min. grade of D, ARCH 334 with min. grade of D, ARCH 335 with min. grade of D, ARCH 403 with min. grade of D, and ARCH 404 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 418 - Architecture VIII
    Structure as an architectural factor; space as an architectural problem; proportion as a means of architectural expression; the expressive value of materials; painting and sculpture in their relationship to architecture. Application of principles in comprehensive projects involving program, site, and code analysis. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 230 with min. grade of D, ARCH 334 with min. grade of D, ARCH 335 with min. grade of D, ARCH 403 with min. grade of D, and ARCH 404 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 419 - Architecture IX
    These studios represent the most extended and developed exercises in macro planning issues. First priority is given to the urgent needs of our environment such as housing, schools, or community buildings for urban centers; projects reinforce the entire curriculum, emphasizing complex relationships of buildings in an urban landscape taking all factors into consideration. Students increase their ability to make value judgments, and learn to critically review, test, and improve conventional concepts of architecture relative to current demands placed upon the profession. These studios also offer students a variety of possible specialization topics. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 230 with min. grade of D, ARCH 334 with min. grade of D, ARCH 335 with min. grade of D, ARCH 403 with min. grade of D, and ARCH 404 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 420 - Architecture X
    These studios represent the most extended and developed exercises in macro planning issues. First priority is given to the urgent needs of our environment such as housing, schools, or community buildings for urban centers; projects reinforce the entire curriculum, emphasizing complex relationships of buildings in an urban landscape taking all factors into consideration. Students increase their ability to make value judgments, and learn to critically review, test and improve conventional concepts of architecture relative to current demands placed upon the profession. These studios also offer students a variety of possible specialization topics. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 230 with min. grade of D, ARCH 334 with min. grade of D, ARCH 335 with min. grade of D, ARCH 403 with min. grade of D, and ARCH 404 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 421 - Energy Conscious Design I
    The application of energy conservation methods and renewable energy sources, such as wind power and passive solar systems, will be examined in the development of building energy budgets for a variety of building types. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 422 - Energy Conscious Design II
    The application of energy conservation methods and renewable energy sources, such as wind power and passive solar systems, will be examined in the development of building energy budgets for a variety of building types. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 421 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 423 - Architectural Programming
    Study of the principles of problem definition, problem solving, and decision making in the process of design. Specific research methods are reviewed, including those with computer-aided data collection potential. Coursework includes: identification of client/project requirements and constraints; development of a building/project program; cost analysis; development of relevant design options; and presentation skills and development. (3-0-3) (C) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 424 - Architectural Construction Management
    A survey of the techniques and procedures of construction management as it relates to architectural practice. The organization of the building team, the collaborative design process, cost control, project scheduling, purchasing, accounting, and field supervision are described and documented. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 427 - Advanced Architectural Computing
    A review of 3-D modeling concepts, computer-aided rendering concepts, and methods in the development of architectural design. Extensive use of PC CAD software is expected. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 125 with min. grade of D and ARCH 226 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 428 - 3D Animation in CAD Presentations
    Review 3-D modeling concepts for animation, preparing camera movements, lighting conditions, special effects, and the digital editing of animation sequences. Extensive use of PC animation and editing software. (1-3-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 427 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 429 - Digital Form Generation
    Introduction to the development of algorithmic design methods, a basis for computational thinking. Review programming in CAD systems, programming basics in AutoCAD, extensive creation of 2D and 3D architectural forms, wall patterns, CAD data interrogation, manipulation, and extraction. Introduction to 2D and 3D parametric and rule-based design. Investigation of form creation based on a variety of mathematical relationships including random generation and form generation based on collected data values including images. Also included is a review of CAD database procedures for space planning and bill of quantities. Includes methods for creating models for the purpose of fabrication including CNC and rapid prototyping. (2-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 125 with min. grade of D, ARCH 226 with min. grade of D, and ARCH 427 with min. grade of D) OR (ARCH 428 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 430 - Web Technology
    Study of the relationship between the built environment and networked technologies. Students will learn principles of designing for networked digital space, ways of augmenting physical space through digital technologies, and how networks and web based communication have transformed the practice of architecture and our daily lives. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 427 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 431 - Visual Training I
    This elective comprises several topics. They include traditional media, e.g. sculpture, collage or free-hand drawing, digital prototyping, exhibition design, digital media production, architectural lighting, interior design, etc. The course provides students the opportunity to pursue individual paths in order to synthesize skills acquired in the previous visual training segments of the curriculum. (1-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 506 with min. grade of C and ARCH 507 with min. grade of C)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 432 - Visual Training II
    This elective comprises several topics. They include traditional media, e.g. sculpture, collage or free-hand drawing, digital prototyping, exhibition design, digital media production, architectural lighting, interior design, etc. The course provides students the opportunity to pursue individual paths in order to synthesize skills acquired in the previous visual training segments of the curriculum. (1-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 506 with min. grade of C and ARCH 507 with min. grade of C)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 433 - Introduction to Digital Fabrication
    This course offers a comprehensive exploration of computer-aided fabrication from concept development and modeling through digital file creation and cutting processes. Using CAD/CAM software, laser cutters, CNC mills, and 3D printers, students with a variety of interests can build the elements of detailed models, fabricate a range of finished objects, or even create landscapes incorporating highly articulated surfaces. The course stresses the integration of the complete thought process from concept development to pre-visualization to detailed modeling to fabrication setup and finishing. Students gain a solid understanding of the rapidly developing world of CAD/CAM techniques while acquiring specific long-term skills in software-based modeling and machine-assisted fabrication. (1-1-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 427) OR (ARCH 508)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 434 - Advanced Building Information Modeling Strategies
    This course is an in-depth exploration of how building information modeling tools are being utilized in the architectural profession with an emphasis on Autodesk Revit. Advanced BIM modeling tools and strategies will be investigated alongside explorations into interoperability between tools. (0-3-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 427) OR (ARCH 508)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 435 - Digital Fabrication
    This course explores the design and fabrication of components in contemporary practice. The class will investigate through the design and prototyping of a custom component. Survey of CAD/CAM/GIS use in practice and component manufacturing including modeling, simulation, and scripting. Behavioral models of components using simulation and analysis tools (flow, system dynamics, etc.). Use of CAD tools to model components for production (modeling for CNC considering toolpaths and jigs). Use of CAD tools to analyze properties of components. Material properties and related fabrication constraints. Current fabrication processes. Use of IIT-owned CNC tools to fabricate components. Rapid prototyping. (1-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 427 with min. grade of D) OR (ARCH 467 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 436 - Advanced Modeling
    This course will focus on 3D modeling of complex geometric components in architecture and design. Concepts explored will concentrate on the advancement of digital design as an iterative process. Various modeling types covered are (1) Explicit Modeling, (2) Nurbs Surface Modeling, (3) Parametric Modeling, and (4) Generative Components and Response Modeling. Output will utilize digital fabrication methods as support of the iterative design process. (0-3-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 427) OR (ARCH 508)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 438 - Design Visualization
    This course is an in-depth exploration of new visualization techniques to support and express architectural design through 3D rendering. Topics covered will include 3D modeling, cameras, lighting, material mapping, and rendering output. Presentation concepts covered include storytelling, rendering style, visual mood, and image composition. (1-3-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 226) OR (ARCH 508)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 445 - Prairie School and Naturalistic Landscape Design
    This significant Midwestern style of landscape and architectural design provided the beginnings of ecology and continues to influence landscape design today. The course specifically addresses the work of designers such as Jens Jensen, O.C. Simonds, and Frank Lloyd Wright, and features IIT's Alfred Caldwell. Students receive an introduction to the types of plants used by these designers and the connections between landscape and architecture will be explored. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 446 - History of Landscape Architecture
    Survey of the history of landscape design throughout the world, including contemporary projects. The course emphasizes both analytical and holistic approaches to the study of historic designs, highlights the relationship between architecture and landscape, and stresses major concepts that directly influence present day designs. One field trip. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 447 - Architecture and Furniture
    Individually or in small groups, students will design and fabricate furniture as part of a collectively developed master plan. Students explore historic and contemporary furniture design, theory, materials, and fabrication techniques. Lectures and discussions will focus on the relationship between architecture and furniture in its 500-year history, the design process, fabrication technologies and techniques, drawing and modeling as a means of exploration, representation, presentation, and fabrication. Labs will allow students the opportunity to experience in a semester the traditional sequence of master plan, schematic design, design development, construction drawings, fabrication, and use. (1-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 454 - Contemporary Chicago Architecture: Case Studies
    Contemporary architecture and urban design projects in Chicago present an invaluable opportunity to learn about some of the most advanced applications in practice today. By examining significant projects currently underway, this course will investigate project execution, design concepts and the various forces affecting projects' definition and results. Close scrutiny of all the components and personnel will give a better understanding of the complex synergies, advanced technologies, and adept project teams necessary for successful innovative architecture and urban planning. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 456 - Topics in Modernism
    Historical and critical study of a significant topic in architecture and urban design tied to important building types, architects, architectural movements, historical periods, or theoretical trends of lasting significance in the twentieth century. Conducted as a seminar, this course analyzes texts, writings, and buildings as students prepare research papers, presentations, and other projects. Recent courses have examined modernism in post-World War II Europe and the United States and the history of the skyscraper from the Chicago school to the present. (3-0-3) (C) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 457 - Architecture and Culture: Challenging the Global Vernacular
    This course investigates the link between architecture and the cultural, climatic, political, and socio-economic environment in which it is created. Taking a different cultural case study each week, it looks at the framework in which architecture is created and examines threads between traditional vernacular and modern forms of architecture. The course will embrace external influencing factors (global) as well as internal (local). As the building typology that has had perhaps the most influence on homogenizing global culture, the course studies tall buildings in their urban fabric. Ultimately, the course is concerned with the debate on Regionalist versus Globalist approaches to architecture. Students will develop critical writing and reading skills, research techniques, and effective argumentation. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 460 - Integrated Building Delivery Practice/BIM
    Architecture has always been a complex interdisciplinary business, where the management of allied professions and industry affiliates is critical to the success of any endeavor of significant scale. The introduction of BIM (Building Information Modeling) is an advance in project delivery tools which should be viewed as a multi-dimensional expansion of the mechanisms of management and accommodation of an ever-broadening range of participants in the organization of a project, allowing the development of a new delivery protocol, IBPD (Integrated Building Project Delivery). BIM is currently recognized as consolidating the basis for a range of functions including drawing, modeling, document management, clash detection, interdisciplinary coordination, estimating, scheduling, constructability review, production modularization, fabrication protocols, and for the analysis of myriad physical and proscriptive demands such as energy consumption, daylighting, code compliance, egress, circulation, and operation scenarios. The breadth of information embedded in a BIM model will require the emergence of facilitating professionals to an extent previously unknown in the practice and the industry. This course explores the state of the profession and the anticipated ramifications. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 461 - Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Architecture
    The course teaches future architects the practical aspects of entrepreneurial small business management, to develop a comprehensive opportunity assessment, and to develop the skills necessary to improve the odds of success. The course will consider strategies to leverage limited resources for maximum effect. The course will also cover small organization and group behavior, performance, leadership, and motivation in small business settings and will focus on the owner/manager as the principal success factor in the context of a small organization. Emphasis is placed on the circumstances and opportunities of the professional practice of architecture: practice as profession, process, organization, business, and evolving models of practice are covered. The course also provides a series of concepts, frameworks, and heuristics that enable the entrepreneur to anticipate and deal with the challenges that accompany growth of an existing business. Cases, exercises, lectures, and speakers are used to focus on choosing opportunities, allocating resources, motivating employees, and maintaining control while not stifling innovation. A key component of the course is how to sustain entrepreneurial thinking in mid-sized ventures as they continue to grow. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 462 - Planning Law and Land Policy
    Since the introduction of basic zoning laws to the numbers and complexity of ordinances attached to any land parcel have proliferated to include those addressing land use, development, density, environmental concerns both on and off site, aesthetic mandates, energy use, quality of life concerns, and infrastructure development, the growing understanding that comprehensive and integrated systems must be managed across property lines to effect sustainable planning and communities will accelerate the number of prescriptive and policy ordinances enforced at the development of a parcel. Many agencies have further created extra-legal linkages between approvals for land development and the provision of social and ideological benefits to the community. The impact on the profession of architecture of the panoply of planning options and governmental goals is the result that the navigation of the system of mandated design determinates is one of the initial and potentially most creative acts in the process of project delivery. Project designers must understand the ramifications and trade-offs inherent in the system, especially in any attempt to achieve the best use of any parcel of land and position the most appropriate built environment. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 463 - Introduction to Real Estate Finance Fundamentals
    The Art of the Deal, with the emphasis on Art, is a term best positioning the financial structuring behind any project. The ability of the project team leader in integrated practice to understand and appreciate the motivations and opportunities inherent in the initiation of the project will be essential in guiding team decisions and maintaining a leadership position. The understanding of the financial underpinnings of a project is of paramount importance to those intending to actually engage the process of initiating and effecting a construction activity. The sources, costs, and sequence of funding, budgeting, cash flow, incentives options, and tax ramifications regarding a project are to be addressed as component knowledge to an understanding of integrated project management. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 464 - Comprehensive Opportunity Assessment and Entrepreneurship Development Project/Practicum
    Two options are available to the student for the acquisition and assimilation of the breadth of knowledge required to bring project ideas to fruition. The Comprehensive Development Project is a capstone effort which will demonstrate project concept, planning resolution, land acquisition strategies, estimating, scheduling, financial pro-forma, and value capture intents. The Practicum would entail employment at a vetted office engaged in the actual process of project assembly. A position requiring a minimum of 20 hours per week, prior review and approval of the work plan, and submittal of documentation of the work undertaken would be required for this scenario. The ultimate objective is to provide a roadmap of the interaction between the architect-entrepreneur, market opportunities, and integrated building delivery practices which facilitate the development of student skills necessary to compete in a rapidly changing socio-economic environment. This course is designed to help students learn and use tools and frameworks to create, implement, and update a strategic plan to shape the future and guide an entrepreneurial organization on its path to success. This course will entail collaboration with real world organizations including city agencies, community development corporations, IIT Department of Community Affairs, or private developers. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study. (6-0-6) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 465 - Construction and Project Management
    The organization of deliverables from the multiple participants in a project plan, including estimating, quality control, value engineering, scheduling of work, conflict resolution, pay schedules, and project close-out and commissioning are essential to managing a building project. Many of these areas of endeavor are those most directly impacted by the developments addressed in Integrated Building Delivery Practice. This course will solidify the underpinnings and will amplify, where needed, the requisite understanding in these areas of the practice. The development of managerial skills requisite to the practice of this coordination and the basis of developing inter-professional relationships will be stressed throughout the incorporation of the technical methodologies. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 466 - Entrepreneurial Design: Sector Studies/Case Studies
    This course will be advanced as an independent study format. Each student will work independently to research a project option, or building type, and document the particular attributes of that case study which require specialized address. Case studies might be a particular business niche such as land sub-divisions, condo conversions, change of use conversions, or build-to-suit options. The studies might pursue particular building types, social initiatives, historic restoration strategies, or even unique construction typologies. Undergraduate students must be in their fifth year of study. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 467 - Advanced Materials Workshop
    This course is designed to involve students with the architectural craft of materials that can be applied to model and prototype construction. Included will be a product project of the student's own choosing. (1-4-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 468 - Drawing From Travel
    A drawing course that develops the perceptual and technical skills critical to drawing in the field. Particular emphasis will be placed on the freehand travel sketch and its capacity to evoke both the physicality and character of a place. Production of a comprehensive drawn record of travels in the form of a journal/sketchbook is required. Various media will be explored. Requisite: European Study Program or Paris Program (0-6-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 469 - Urban Design in Europe
    This seminar course will explore current notions of urbanity as observed in the built environment of some cities in Europe. Projects and discussions will complement the design work undertaken in the architecture design studio. Assignments will focus on documentation and analysis of the various daily patterns and rituals of habitation. Requisite: European Study Program or Paris Program (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 470 - Image City: Mediation of Space
    This seminar surveys the interaction between media and the city from the 19th century to the present. A history of the technological innovations of the last two hundred years turns out to be, in large part, a history of the development of the contemporary city, and no account of contemporary urban issues can be considered complete without taking into account the role played in our lives by the media. Accordingly, every space we encounter or create has to be considered mediated. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 471 - Architectural Freehand Rendering
    Utilizing site visits, lectures, presentations, and critiques, students will learn freehand sketching, perspective, and conceptual sketching to convey building spatial ideas. Conceptual and schematic analysis of site visits will teach students to represent existing spaces, environments, and buildings as well as various building materials. Students will rely on four media to quicken their drawing skills and visual analysis -- pencil, ink, pastel, and water color. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 109 with min. grade of D)] AND [(ARCH 110 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 473 - Conflict and Time
    This seminar employs comparative studies of other arts, in particular cinema, to illuminate architectural esthetics and the creative process. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 474 - Production/Design
    This seminar examines aspects of design in motion pictures. The premise underlying the course is that the act of perception constitutes an act of design; we produce and design the world we perceive. This becomes particularly evident through analysis of the artificially constructed, illusory reality of films. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 475 - Spatial Stories
    This course will examine the spatial story as it appears in diverse media: short fiction, films, everyday discourse, the media architecture, etc. The course work will consist of reading and writing assignments, as well as the viewing of films and other visual artifacts. The course has two goals: to offer students the opportunity to improve their study and communication skills and to examine the social, cultural and historical aspects of spatial practices such as architecture. (3-0-3) (C) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 476 - Developed Surface
    This course looks at models as operational and instrumental tools that assist an architect to control both the material and the meaningful. Acting as an advanced seminar and workshop, course sessions will juxtapose speculative model making with seminar discussion. Student work will be reviewed in direct relation to readings and short lectures on historical and theoretical precedents in art, architecture, and urban design. Field research will support speculative mapping and modeling systems. A project to support the studio will reconcile a conceptual interest with a technical one. (Paris Program) (3-3-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 477 - Building as Model
    This course examines moments of paradigmatic change from the late 19th to the early 20th century in European architecture, urban planning, and urban design. Beginning with Violet-le-Duc and ending with the first iterations of OMA, the course prioritizes "building" as an act rather than as an object. The class examines moments when technical and social change reshaped dependent, but sometimes academically opposed, realms of design practice. The first realm considers architecture's relationship with power within the socio-political context. The second aspect considers architecture as a discipline of control as students examine how ideas of architectural practice were strongly connected to the story of industrial production. (Paris Program) (3-3-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 480 - Materials and Construction
    This course provides an overview of basic building materials and assemblies, how they are constructed, and the relationships between them. The objective is to introduce students to the range of material choices available to the designer, new materials and assemblies, and fundamental principles to guide design decisions. The course is organized according to the MasterFormat outline developed by the Construction Specifications Institute. Students will learn standards for writing specifications using a system of numbered categories to organize construction activities, products, and requirements into a standard order. Topics include pre-design issues, sites and foundations, concrete, masonry, metals, wood, plastics, thermal and moisture protection, glass, roofing systems, and conveying equipment. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 481 - Materiality in Architecture
    This history/theory course examines the topic of materiality in contemporary architecture and explores the different approaches, ideas, and philosophies associated with aspects of materiality in architecture through investigation and discussion of case study projects by contemporary architects. Students are introduced to a variety of approaches to the topic since the dawn of the Modern Movement, and they explore how different contemporary architects approach the ideas of materiality in their work through their words, thoughts, and built work. Thematic topics related to materiality are also discussed, including landscape, technology, and memory. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 485 - Structures I: Concepts
    Examination of the basic and vast range of structural concepts and solutions, in an illustrated and summary format. Examples include historic as well as contemporary structures. Statics and strength of materials, beam theory, shear and bending moment diagrams, deflection analysis. Overview of systems choices in architectural applications. History of strength of materials. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 486 - Structures II: Design of Wood and Steel
    Analysis, design and detailing of tectonic systems (steel and wood). Design of compression, tension and flexural members. Design of timber beams and columns. Design of steel beams and columns. The behavior of structures under static and dynamic loads. Analysis, design and detailing of concrete and masonry systems. Theory of reinforced concrete applied to beams and slabs. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 485 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 487 - Eco Structures
    Research seminar giving focus to new technologies, especially complex structures: biotechnic, pneumatic, ultra-tall, composite structures, etc. Students conduct research using literature, data sources, and ideas to prepare imaginative small project interdisciplinary approach to solving problems in the built environment. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 488 - Long-Span and Special Structures
    Introduction of structural systems for long spans and special structures. The structural behavior will be discussed and the required strength and stiffness will be evaluated. Individual projects will be assigned to students to be presented at the end of the course. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 489 - Structural Systems for Tall Buildings and Long-Span Structures
    This course reviews the historical development of the interaction of the structure with architecture and explores future trends and directions. The suitability of different materials and systems will be studied, with emphasis placed on efficiency. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 491 - Special Problems
    Independent study of projects and problems. Students must be advised and have consent of the instructor and approval of the dean. (Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 495 - Technology as Design
    Since the development of cast iron as a viable construction material in the mid-1800s, one path of architecture has explored the open-ended possibilities of technology. Integrated within the culture, this determination to use the technology of one's time as the creative generator of a new evolving architecture becomes the historical precedent of the thesis of this course. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 497 - Special Projects
    Independent study of projects and problems. Students must be advised and have consent of the instructor and approval of the dean. (Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 500 - History of Architectural Ideas I
    A comprehensive and critical reading of architectural ideas and built form from classical times until the late 19th century. With a focus on primary readings and building documentation, the course surveys the embodiment of ideas within the panorama of changing styles, techniques, and attitudes, highlighting the critical debates of each epoch. It places an emphasis on the great complexity of social, political, intellectual, and material forces affecting architectural thought and design. Critical reading and writing skills will be emphasized. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 501 - History of Architectural Ideas II
    The second half of a two-semester survey, this course is devoted to the history of architectural ideas from 1900 to the present. It begins with the first attempts to formulate a modern architecture in the early years of the twentieth century; continues to address the consolidation of modern architecture between the world wars, postwar extensions of modernism, and the critiques posed by various forms of post-modernism; and concludes with a range of contemporary issues, including globalization, digital technology, and sustainability. With a focus on primary readings and building documentation, the course is intended to survey the embodiment of ideas within the panorama of changing styles, techniques, and attitudes. It places an emphasis on the great complexity of social, political, intellectual, and technological forces affecting design. Critical reading and writing skills will be emphasized. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 502 - Advanced Topics in History and Theory I
    Intended to build on the knowledge and abilities gained in the foundational architectural history and theory courses. This seminar focuses on advanced topics in history, theory, and criticism. Students select from varying and diverse topics such as urbanism, sustainability, design methodology, aesthetics, ethics and law, history of technology, and architecture in relation to other arts. Seminar may also offer intense focus on particular architects, periods, regions, or movements. Critical reading and writing skills will be emphasized. In addition, the advanced seminar will teach research skills, will expect the students to formulate and pursue original research topics, and will expect oral presentations of these projects. These abilities will be evaluated through in-class presentations and research papers. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 503 - Advanced Topics in History and Theory II
    Intended to build on the knowledge and abilities gained in the foundational architectural history and theory courses. This seminar focuses on advanced topics in history, theory, and criticism. Students select from varying and diverse topics such as urbanism, sustainability, design methodology, aesthetics, ethics and law, history of technology, and architecture in relation to other arts. Seminar may also offer intense focus on particular architects, periods, regions, or movements. Critical reading and writing skills will be emphasized. In addition, the advanced seminar will teach research skills, will expect the students to formulate and pursue original research topics, and will expect oral presentations of these projects. These abilities will be evaluated through in-class presentations and research papers. (Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 505 - Ecology, Sustainability, and Site
    Students will develop a sensitivity to the environment in which architecture is created. Emphasis will be placed on an in-depth exposure to the integration of natural features of site, sustainable components of both natural and man-made systems, and the synergy of ecological design. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 506 - Visual Training Digital Media
    The development of visual acuity through the analysis of aesthetic expression. Exercises in visual perception and aesthetic judgment transition from traditionally hand manipulated to digital media. Critical inquiry of media; isolation and analysis; interdependence and integration of sensuous qualities. Exercises include the study of proportion and rhythm, texture and color, mass and space. Topics of inquiry vary. (1-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 507 - Visual Training Materials Expl
    The course will include the research and study of the architectural surface and the integration into built form. Facade systems, enclosure assemblies, and related materials will be investigated as part of a graphic study as well as full scale built application. The relationships of materials and construction methods will be evaluated with respect to architectural expression and performance. (1-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 506)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 508 - Digital Applications in Design
    An exploration of digital design applications and techniques as a means of architectural information expression. This class will look at the elaborate toolset of digital design in architectural practice with a primary focus on Building Information Modeling. Utilizing BIM and Parametric modeling, the students will generate 3D building models for use in design, energy analysis, estimating scheduling and renderings. BIM provides continuous immediate feedback for the student and, through utilizing this model, the student will also be aware of this new efficient way for multi-disciplines to work collaboratively. (1-2-3) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 506)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 509 - Topics in Advanced Technology
    This research seminar examines advances in the technologies that affect the practice of architecture. The course examines leading technologies, processes, and applications, and their role in building design and production. The course will navigate the broad and varied materials related to advanced technologies in architecture by focusing on specific applications for specific projects. Students may select between varying and diverse topics offered by the faculty that may include building envelopes, architectural materials, building and environmental systems, advanced structural design, energy and sustainability, architectural acoustics and lighting, fabrication, and computer-aided design technologies. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 520 - Principles of Urban Planning and Design
    An immersion in the history, discourse, and culture of cities in the modern era with an emphasis on Chicago and a focus on the needs and influences surrounding urban growth, development, and culture. Readings, lectures, case studies, film screenings, field trips, and discussions will provide a basic set of conceptual and theoretical resources for understanding the origins and development of cities. Although the more disciplinary concerns of urban design will be covered in the concurrent Arch 545 studio, this course will also develop a context for understanding the role of design in shaping the urban environment. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 523 - Masters Project Preparation: Research Analysis and Programming
    Identification and development of the proposal for the master's project. Development of the project will include a comprehensive listing of all necessary program elements, research, analysis and selection of site, a statement of design parameters, project objectives, or similar project characteristics. Projects will be selected from eight areas of focus: sustainable cities, building delivery practices, community-based planning, research/history/theory, research/advanced technologies, housing and urban design, high-rise typology, and cultural institutions. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 541 - Methodology, Material, and Technique
    This studio is an introduction to design methods and fundamental architectural principles through exercises focusing on methodology, materiality, and architectural language. Exercises sequentially become more complex in relation to the physical properties and qualities of spatial complexity, function, and materiality. Emphasis on exploration and technique within the design process. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 542 - Materiality Projects
    This studio explores the relationship between spatial definition and material properties, construction methods, and structural typologies through a series of sequential architectural projects. It introduces architecture as an integrated practice that unifies intention, material, construction, and spatial definitions. Emphasis is placed on materials and applications as fundamental components of architecture. The course promotes a collaborative approach as essential to research and professional practice. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 541)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 543 - Structurally Determinant Project
    This studio introduces the premise that design and the pursuit of architecture is enhanced by the integration of and sensitivity to the essential determinates of the composition. Sensitivity will be developed through a single architectural project and accompanying structural component that will focus on the way in which site, function, and material choice coalesce into a structurally determinant form. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 542)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 544 - Comprehensive Building Project
    This studio focuses on the design of a single building demonstrating the synthesis of ecological planning, programming, and code with zoning analysis, structure, and building systems. Students will be able to select from varied studio topics. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 543)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 545 - Community-Based Building Project
    In this studio, students will be introduced to the discipline and techniques of urban design through the understanding of temporality, density, infrastructure, and public space through the scale of a singular building within the context of a larger built environment. Focus will be given to the direct interaction with public agencies, community groups, developers, and community development corporations. The public orientation of the studios will provide an understanding of urban design as a fundamentally future-oriented practice with an expanded potential for engagement in the socio-political. Students will be able to select from varied studio topics. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 544)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 546 - Studio VI: Comprehensive Building Design II
    The development of an architectural project with an emphasis on comprehensive building design: advanced site development, spatial relationships between interior and exterior landscape, zoning and code analysis, programming, and fully integrated building systems. Study focuses on environmental concerns in building design. Studio work includes a comprehensive set of architectural documents, articulated model, and architectural details representative of the building's concepts. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 545)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 551 - Design of Energy-Efficient Buildings I
    Design criteria for achieving human performance goals in energy-efficient buildings, criteria for the exterior/interior environment, and criteria for architectural, mechanical, electrical and building system components. Building upon the fall course, various energy-conserving strategies shall be evaluated for achieving cost effective, energy-efficient design of a specific building type. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 552 - Design of Energy-Efficient Buildings II
    Design criteria for achieving human performance goals in energy-efficient buildings, criteria for the exterior/interior environment, and criteria for architectural, mechanical, electrical and building system components. Building upon the fall course, various energy-conserving strategies shall be evaluated for achieving cost effective, energy-efficient design of a specific building type. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 553 - High-Rise Building Technology I
    The course consists of presentations by specialists in the various technologies of high rise buildings including planning, financing, code reinforcement, materials, architecture, engineering, project management, construction, building management services, safety, and maintenance. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 554 - High-Rise Building Technology II
    The course consists of presentations by specialists in the various technologies of high rise buildings including planning, financing, code reinforcement, materials, architecture, engineering, project management, construction, building management services, safety, and maintenance. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 560 - Integrated Building Delivery Practice/BIM
    Architecture has always been a complex interdisciplinary business, where the management of allied professions and industry affiliates is critical to the success of any endeavor of significant scale. The introduction of BIM (Building Information Modeling) is an advance in project delivery tools which should be viewed as a multi-dimensional expansion of the mechanisms of management and accommodation of an ever-broadening range of participants in the organization of a project, allowing the development of a new delivery protocol, IBPD (Integrated Building Project Delivery). BIM is currently recognized as consolidating the basis for a range of functions including drawing, modeling, document management, clash detection, interdisciplinary coordination, estimating, scheduling, constructability review, production modularization, fabrication protocols, and for the analysis of myriad physical and proscriptive demands such as energy consumption, daylighting, code compliance, egress, circulation, and operation scenarios. The breadth of information embedded in a BIM model will require the emergence of facilitating professionals to an extent previously unknown in the practice and the industry. This course explores the state of the profession and the anticipated ramifications. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 561 - Entrepreneurship and Innovation in Architecture
    The course teaches future architects the practical aspects of entrepreneurial small business management, to develop a comprehensive opportunity assessment and to develop the skills necessary to improve the odds of success. The course will consider strategies to leverage limited resources for maximum effect. The course will also cover small organization and group behavior, performance, leadership, and motivation in small business settings and will focus on the owner/manager as the principal success factor in the context of a small organization. Emphasis is placed on the circumstances and opportunities of the professional practice of architecture: practice as profession, process, organization, business, and evolving models of practice are covered. The course also provides a series of concepts, frameworks, and heuristics that enable the entrepreneur to anticipate and deal with the challenges that accompany growth of an existing business. Cases, exercises, lectures, and speakers are used to focus on choosing opportunities, allocating resources, motivating employees, and maintaining control while not stifling innovation. A key component of the course is how to sustain entrepreneurial thinking in mid-sized ventures as they continue to grow. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 562 - Planning Law and Land Policy
    Since the introduction of basic zoning laws to the numbers and complexity of ordinances attached to any land parcel have proliferated to include those addressing land use, development, density, environmental concerns both on and off site, aesthetic mandates, energy use, quality of life concerns, and infrastructure development, the growing understanding that comprehensive and integrated systems must be managed across property lines to effect sustainable planning and communities will accelerate the number of prescriptive and policy ordinances enforced at the development of a parcel. Many agencies have further created extra-legal linkages between approvals for land development and the provision of social and ideological benefits to the community. The impact on the profession of architecture of the panoply of planning options and governmental goals is the result that the navigation of the system of mandated design determinates is one of the initial and potentially most creative acts in the process of project delivery. Project designers must understand the ramifications and trade-offs inherent in the system, especially in any attempt to achieve the best use of any parcel of land and position the most appropriate built environment. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 563 - Introduction to Real Estate Finance Fundamentals
    The Art of the Deal, with the emphasis on Art, is a term best positioning the financial structuring behind any project. The ability of the project team leader in integrated practice to understand and appreciate the motivations and opportunities inherent in the initiation of the project will be essential in guiding team decisions and maintaining a leadership position. The understanding of the financial underpinnings of a project is of paramount importance to those intending to actually engage the process of initiating and effecting a construction activity. The sources, costs, and sequence of funding, budgeting, cash flow, incentives options, and tax ramifications regarding a project are to be addressed as component knowledge to an understanding of integrated project management. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 564 - Comprehensive Opportunity Assessment and Entrepreneurship Development Project/Practicum
    Two options are available to the student for the acquisition and assimilation of the breadth of knowledge required to bring project ideas to fruition. The Comprehensive Development Project is a capstone effort which will demonstrate project concept, planning resolution, land acquisition strategies, estimating, scheduling, financial pro-forma, and value capture intents. The practicum would entail employment at a vetted office engaged in the actual process of project assembly. A position requiring a minimum of 20 hours per week, prior review and approval of the work plan, and submittal of documentation of the work undertaken would be required for this scenario. The ultimate objective is to provide a roadmap of the interaction between the architect-entrepreneur, market opportunities, and integrated building delivery practices which facilitate the development of student skills necessary to compete in a rapidly changing socio-economic environment. This course is designed to help students learn and use tools and frameworks to create, implement, and update a strategic plan to shape the future and guide an entrepreneurial organization on its path to success. This course will entail collaboration with real world organizations including city agencies, community development corporations, IIT Department of Community Affairs, or private developers. (6-0-6) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 565 - Construction and Project Management
    The organization of deliverables from the multiple participants in a project plan, including estimating, quality control, value engineering, scheduling of work, conflict resolution, pay schedules, and project close-out and commissioning are essential to managing a building project. Many of these areas of endeavor are those most directly impacted by the developments addressed in Integrated Building Delivery Practice. This course will solidify the underpinnings and will amplify, where needed, the requisite understanding in these areas of the practice. The development of managerial skills requisite to the practice of this coordination and the basis of developing inter-professional relationships will be stressed throughout the incorporation of the technical methodologies. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 566 - Entrepreneurial Design: Sector Studies/Case Studies
    This course will be advanced as an independent study format. Each student will work independently to research a project option, or building type, and document the particular attributes of that case study which require specialized address. Case studies might be a particular business niche, such as land sub-divisions, condo conversions, change of use conversions, or build-to-suit options. The studies might pursue particular building types, social initiatives, historic restoration strategies, or even unique construction typologies. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 588 - Thesis Preparation Seminar
    Seminars are conducted on thesis development and preparation with emphasis placed on language, the written form, thesis manual requirements, drawing and model presentation, and the oral presentation for jury examination. (0-3-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 589 - Pre-Thesis Seminar
    An introduction to the architecture faculty through a discussion of current issues and future directions of the profession. These concerns are then related to the student's interest and the specialized experience of the faculty. By the end of the semester, a Thesis Advisory Committee, with a thesis chairman and two additional faculty members, is assigned to each thesis student. Together, they identify the Thesis Project, program, its scope and objective and, most important, budget time for each phase. (0-3-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 590 - Specialized Research and Thesis Development
    Each thesis project must demonstrate an intellectual objective and an in-depth study that will contribute to the practice of architecture. The formulated problem should combine a theoretical search with the practical considerations of the profession. Research methods are identified that will provide the resources and information necessary for the design process. Post-occupancy building evaluations of similar problems are used to analyze technical assumptions, functional response and social reaction. (Credit: Variable) (Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 591 - Research and Thesis
    A thesis project is developed in depth by the student under the direction of the adviser and an advisory committee of other architecture faculty and/or professional members. Specialized research and design within a wide range of architectural problems include site selection, consideration of architectural context and environmental impacts, development of user function and space programs, and architectural planning and design. Aesthetic and visual aspects and the intellectual foundations of the problem are carefully considered, as well as the technical aspects in the selection and integration of structural and environmental systems. After final acceptance of the presentation materials by the advisory committee, the text, reductions of the drawings, and model photographs are bound together in a hard-cover volume, which is deposited in the GRC and the university's library. (Credits: Variable, minimum total eight semester hours). (Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 593 - Masters Project
    The Masters Project is the culmination of both the two-year and three-year Master of Architecture curricula -- the synthesis of architectural study into an independent project. The Project is, most commonly, the design of a building or in-depth research about specific aspects of the built environment. Specialized research and design within a wide range of architectural problems include site selection, consideration of architectural context and environmental impacts, development of user function and space programs, and architectural planning and design. Aesthetic and visual aspects and the intellectual foundations of the problem are carefully considered, as well as the technical aspects in the selection and integration of structural and environmental systems. Successful Masters project proposals will be grouped into "Areas of Focus" studios. After final acceptance of the presentation materials by the faculty advisor and the "Area of Focus" teaching faculty, the text, reductions of the drawings, and model photographs are bound together, which are deposited in the GRC and the University's library. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(ARCH 523)] Corequisite: None
    ARCH 594 - Research Problems
    (Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 596 - ARCH IPRO
    (0-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 597 - Special Problems
    (Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 601 - Doctoral Methodology Pre-Seminar
    This course provides a foundation for doctoral students in the diversity of research paradigms in architecture. The first component is an introduction to philosophy of knowledge with an emphasis on architecture. The second component entails a critical review and evaluation of diverse research methodologies in current doctoral architectural research. It is intended to provide substantial information on research methodologies not covered in undergraduate and graduate education. In this course students will write a series of papers that critically review the course readings and discussions. (3-3-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 611 - Seminar in Theory and Technology I
    It will explore the history of modern architectural theory from the late seventeenth-century to 1975 with special regard to technology and its relationship to architectural culture. At times architectural theory forms a backdrop to architectural practice while seemingly taking little account of technological events. At other times technology and its material innovations change the very nature of architectural practice and its discourse. The course will consist of short lecture, presentations, and discussion. (0-3-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 612 - Seminar in Theory and Technology II
    It will form a continuation of ARCH 611 and consider the interface of theory and technology over the last thirty years. Students will take a more active role in tailoring their participation to advance their research in the dissertation and thesis topics they wish to pursue. Larger thematic issues of theory and technology will be considered within the richness of contemporary debates and competing interests. Students will present papers and a collective seminar document or publication will be produced. (0-3-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    ARCH 691 - Doctoral Research
    (Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    AURB 201 - The Elements of Urbanism
    The fundamental components, structures, systems, and networks of cities. Historical and contemporary examples of urban realms along with context of Chicago are examined to develop a working knowledge of the physical and systemic components of cities. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    AURB 465 - Principles of Urbanism
    Advanced study of infrastructure, networks, and systemic character that define the urban realm including an examination of ecologic, economic, social, and compositional frameworks. Historical and current discourse of urban conditions and planning. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(AURB 201 with min. grade of D)] Corequisite: None
    AURB 520 - Principles of Urbanism and City Planning
    Advanced study of infrastructure, networks, and systemic character that define the urban realm and urban issues with an examination and analysis of ecological, economic, social, and compositional frameworks. Students will explore historical and current discourse of urban conditions and planning. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 443 - Forests, Preserves, Parks, and Urbanscapes
    The growing need for these public site types in America in the 1800s gave rise to the landscape architecture profession. More necessary now than ever, the planning and design approach to these sites is undergoing major change. In this course students will investigate the historical and contemporary environmental and cultural relationships of the American landscape. Themes include landscape use and ecological change, regional and national landscapes, the roles of the National Park Service, state and county park and forest systems, and municipal green spaces. Case studies and analyses of specific sites. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 497 - Special Projects
    Special projects. (Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 501 - Nature of Ecology
    An historical, theoretical, and scientific account of nature's role in the humanities and sciences as they relate to design. Emphasis is placed on the relationships between natural systems and the fitness of a landscape, the site and the organism, open and closed systems, causation and constraints, sustainability, and the complex interplay between humans and the designed environment. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 502 - Landscape Architectural History: From Antiquity to Olmsted
    The chronological history of landscape design from antiquity to Olmsted, with emphasis on garden and park typologies. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 503 - Advanced Contemporary Theory: Case Studies
    The study of 20th century landscape design with an emphasis on the Prairie School, modernism, organicism, and contemporary trends. The course is split between lecture and in-depth case studies of significant landscapes from the Chicago region and beyond. Collection information from the study projects' authors and weekend site visits will lead to models and representations (drawings, videos, etc.) that reveal otherwise latent aspects of each study project's organization, perceptual character, appearance, and performance. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 514 - Professional Practice of Landscape Architecture
    An introduction to landscape architecture as a profession. Lectures, research assignments, and case studies will address issues including firm practice types, proposals and contracts, schedule and budget, project phases, project and client types, project team structure, the role of competitions, and professional development and licensure. (3-3-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 515 - Firms, Parks, Developers
    The players who orchestrate and manage landscapes, including planners, landscape architects, trusts, governmental agencies, and developers; and their economic, professional, political, and socio-cultural concerns and responsibilities. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 516 - Historic Landscape Preservation
    Survey of historic landscape preservation theory, method, and practice, and their relationship to environmental and cultural considerations. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 525 - Representing and Modeling the Landscape
    Using hand drawing and physical modeling to explore and interrogate landscape processes. Techniques and methods to explore, develop, and envision ideas particular to landscape design. Mapping, time, movement, body in space, line, contour, texture, flows of materials (hydro, litho, aero), and plant communities. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 526 - Digital Media
    Using digital tools to clarify, conceptualize, represent, and communicate the forces and flows within designed and engineered environments. A fluidity between critical, visual, and quantifiable digital techniques will be cultivated and will ground the management of information across software platforms. Focus on Photoshop, Illustrator, and AutoCAD. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(LA 525)] Corequisite: None
    LA 527 - Advanced Modeling and Fabrication
    Students learn advanced digital fabrication and modeling techniques necessary to understand complex three-dimensional surfaces, objects, and space, as well as dynamic processes. Modeling, rendering, scripting, and animation skills are used to conduct, generate, and communicate research. (3-0-3) Prerequisite: [(LA 525 and LA 526)] Corequisite: None
    LA 541 - Studio I: Dynamics and Processes of Place
    Understanding the fundamental relationships of dynamic natural processes, with an emphasis on representing time, movement, space, light, natural rhythms, shifting boundaries and enclosures, and the physical materials of landscape. Within a "natural" setting, students use varied tools (including the body) to measure and record landscape-specific phenomena and conditions such as erosion, entropy, edges, and movement through dynamic spaces. Students develop insightful and appropriately precise methods of modeling and representing these phenomena. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 542 - Studio II: Site and City
    Introduction to ecosystems and how human interaction affects them. Emphasis on the Midwestern prairie and forest biome's wildlife, vegetation, climate, water, and aquatic ecosystems. Effects of human land use patterns on the land and on plant communities, and how they can be altered. Techniques and terms used by environmentalists and instruction in conducting a baseline ecosystem study. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 543 - Studio III: Comprehensive Landscape Design
    The integration of local ecologies, projected use, and the performance of ephemeral, semi-permanent, and permanent site interventions into cohesive and resilient design proposals for varied urban sites. Introduction to a wide range of site-specific and common design standards including ADA and Barrier-Free regulations. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: [(LA 542)] Corequisite: None
    LA 544 - Studio IV: Site, City, and Region
    Continuing investigation of native woody species as a major element in the landscape and traditional plant configurations such as bosques and allies in the built environment. Further study of native perennials and appropriate non-natives. Segment on use of annual and tropical plants within a design; container plantings as accents. Criteria for development of planting design and plant list, as well as plant selection, and technical aspects including hardiness zones, and soil requirements. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 545 - Studio V: Advanced Landscape Design Investigations
    Integration of large-scale site, programming, planting design, ecology of site, and other design elements and problems into a cohesive design solution. Practical application of the relationship among sites, drawings, and the making of landscape architectural projects. The semester is sequenced: site analysis; programming decisions; site modeling; development of design; representation and defense of design graphically (plan and elevation views), model, and materials and planting list. Design of environments which are responsive to human need and expressive physiographic conditions. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 546 - Studio VI: Advanced Landscape Design Investigations
    Critical synthesis of complex environmental, regulatory, and cultural conditions with multi-faceted programs demanding a mastery of knowledge, skill, and technique appropriate for a graduating student. (0-12-6) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 565 - Ecology and Materials Workshop I: Plants and Planting
    The plants of the Western Great Lakes Basin, emphasizing both prominent native and commercially available species. Understanding and identifying species as found within typical plant communities. Familiarization with plant physiology as determined by climate, geology, topography, hydrology, soils, wildlife, and disturbances (natural and anthropogenic). (2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 566 - Ecology and Materials Workshop II: Earthworks and Infrastructures
    The qualities and characteristics of "soft" and "hard" landscape materials with emphasis on a quantitative and interrelated understanding of landform (grading) and drainage design. Covers the influence of climate, geology, soils, hydrology, and disturbances on the design of a site's constituent elements including pathways and roads, infrastructure, plantings, and storm water management strategy. (2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 567 - Ecology and Materials Workshop III: Horticulture and Design
    Advanced understanding of horticulture as a technical science. The relationship between ecological research and a designed and engineered site, and applications thereof. (2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 568 - Ecology and Materials Workshop IV: Manufacturing the Urban Environment
    Techniques and technologies to analyze, construct, remediate and/or restore urban sites, including those that have been subjected to complex human disturbances, such as landfills and brownfields. Includes special needs construction practices such as structured soils, phytoremediation, green roofs and rooftop gardens. Overview of relevant sit-specific codes and environmentally oriented building programs such as LEED. (2-2-3) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    LA 597 - Special Problems
    Special problems in landscape architecture. For students in the master program in landscape architecture only. (Credit: Variable) Prerequisite: None Corequisite: None
    Last modified: Jun. 16, 2013