College Courses for Credit

Are you a high school student interested in challenging yourself with college-level coursework? Taking one of our courses can help you get a head start on college and expose you to the many degree options Illinois Tech offers.

Students will take these courses entirely online, with your high school and Illinois Tech teachers, and Illinois Tech teaching assistants available to assist you. Illinois Tech is Chicago’s only tech-focused university, with a long history of graduating rigorously prepared scientists and engineers. Hundreds of high school students have successfully completed our courses.  

All for-credit courses for high school students are provided at a flat rate of $300. Additionally, some courses require students to purchase textbooks. Book fees can range from $50–$100 per course. Chicago Public Schools students are eligible to attend the CS 331 course on a full scholarship. Please view eligibility and recommended coursework under each course description.

Course participation will require a laptop or desktop computer, a strong internet connection, and the ability to download and install software.

Apply Here 

Fall Course Deadlines

Applications are due by August 7 for the fall 2020 term. Fall term begins August 24, 2020. Admitted students will be sent payment links upon admission and will be required to submit payment no later than August 14.

Spring Course Deadlines

Applications are due by November 1 for the spring 2021 term. Spring term begins January 11, 2021. Admitted students will be sent payment links upon admission and will be required to submit payment no later than December 4, 2020.

Online Classes Offered to High School Students

Semester
Course
Day
Times
Professor
Prerequisites
Credits
Cost

Fall 2020

PHYS 120-01: Astronomy

M, W

10–11:15 a.m.

David Gidalevitz

Yes, Pre-Calculus and Algebra-Based Physics

3

$300

Fall 2020

CHEM 122-06: Principles of Chem I (w/out lab)

M, W

10–11:15 a.m.

Benjamin Zion

None

3

$300

Fall 2020

CHEM 122-07: Principles of Chem I (w/out lab)

T, R

11:25 a.m.–12:40 p.m.

Benjamin Zion

None

3

$300

Spring 2021

CS331: Data Structures and Algorithms

N/A

Asynchronous 

Michael Saelee

Yes, see course description below

3

Free for CPS; $300 for all other students

 

Course Descriptions

A descriptive survey of observational astronomy, the solar system, stellar evolution, pulsars, black holes, galaxies, quasars, the origin and fate of the universe.

Your Instructor

PHYS 120 is offered through Illinois Tech’s Department of Physics and taught by David Gidalevitz, an Associate Professor of Physics. The slides of Prof. Gidalevitz lectures will be posted online allowing you to review them on demand the entire semester. The homework will be given every week using Pearson’s Mastering Astronomy platform.

What You Will Learn

Students are expected to master:

  • An understanding of the motions of the earth, moon, and planets and their relationship to our view of the cosmos and physical consequences of those motions (seasons, phases of the moon, etc.)
  • Concepts of solar system formation and the basic properties of our solar system
  • Principles which govern stellar birth, evolution and death and the ultimate state of our own sun and solar system
  • The principle  of gravity; understanding of the radio through gamma  ray spectrum;  emission vs. absorption lines; basics of special relativity as it applies to astrophysics
  • An understanding of what a galaxy is and the different kinds of galaxies including quasars
  • A basic understanding of the birth, current state and likely future evolution of our universe

Prerequisites

To be eligible, you must have completed Precalculus and algebra based Physics courses.

An introduction to the foundations of chemistry, including: atoms and molecules; stoichiometry of chemical reactions; thermochemistry; properties of gases; states of matter, chemical solutions; the molecular basis for chemical reactivity; atomic structure; periodicity; and chemical bonding. 

Your Instructor

Ben Zion

Education

B.A. Lawrence University

Ph.D. University of Chicago

Research Interests

Doctoral studies at the University of Chicago focused on reactions at surfaces, specifically oxidation and reactions on oxide surfaces. The principle technique employed was high resolution electron energy loss spectrometry (HREELS) to monitor in-situ development of surface vibrational features as qualitative and quantitative measures of reaction.

Post graduate studies at Penn State University also focused on surface interactions. Second neutral emissions were conducted to monitor surface ablation products from primary ion impact. These studies were designed to bridge the gap in understanding between molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and time-of-flight, secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). MD gives results that cannot distinguish between ionic and neutral species whereas TOF-SIMS can only monitor ablated ionic species.

Between academic research postings, I worked for two years in industrial product development at EInk Corp. in Cambridge, MA. I developed waveforms for driving the novel display technology of micro-encapsulated nanoparticles for grayscale rendering. This technology and these waveforms can be seen in products like Amazon's black-and-white Kindle eReader.

What You Will Learn

  • Recognize the steps of scientific method.
  • Relate different types of measurements to the quantifying principles of chemistry.
  • Describe the structure of matter on atomic and molecular levels.
  • Employ chemical nomenclature to describe structure and reactions.
  • Identify types of chemical reactions.
  • Characterize the differences in the states of matter and the unique properties associated with each.
  • Describe and quantify the energetics of chemical reactions.

Objectives for each chapter will be posted on the Blackboard and Sapling webpages.

Your Instructor

CS 331 is offered through Illinois Tech’s Department of Computer Science and taught by Michael Saelee, a senior instructor. Saelee’s lectures will be posted online alongside slides and screencasts, allowing you to review them on demand the entire semester. CS teachers at your high school will also be given materials to assist you with the programming assignments, and a dedicated Illinois Tech teaching assistant is also assigned to help all high school students.

You Will Learn

  • How to analyze the time and space complexity of algorithms using asymptotic upper bounds (big-O notation)
  • How to design, implement, and analyze the time and space performance of recursive functions, and how recursion relies on the run-time stack
  • The motivation for, design, and implementation of classical data structures, including lists, stacks, queues, expression trees, binary search trees, heaps, and hash tables
  • How to leverage object-oriented patterns such as composition, inheritance, and polymorphism in the implementation of the above data structures
  • Essential searching and sorting algorithms
  • How to select and use data-structures in order to solve various problems
  • Various features of the Python programming language, which will be used throughout the course. These features include:
    • Built-in data types, including strings, lists, tuples, sets, and dictionaries
    • Iterators, generator expressions, and list comprehensions
    • Lambda expressions and higher order functions
    • Random numbers, timing, and unit test modules

To be eligible, you must have completed a CS1-equivalent course of the AP CS A course/exam with a score of 5, or a score of 4 with your computer science teacher recommendation, and you must enroll in a data structures or independent computer science course at your high school in spring 2021 that you can take in conjunction with the Illinois Tech course. We estimate the time commitment for a student is 6–10 hours per week. Please note that some universities will not accept the Illinois Tech credit for this course unless you have Introductory Programming credit from the AP CS A exam.