H-1B status is appropriate for most international researchers, faculty, and staff who will work temporarily in a position that requires the minimum of a bachelor’s degree and who will perform work in a specialized occupation. For the purposes of the H-1B status, a speciality occupation requires “(A) theoretical and practical application of a body of highly specialized knowledge, and (B) attainment of a bachelor’s or higher degree in the specific specialty as a minimum for entry into the occupation in the United States.” INA214(i); 8USC 1184(i)

The hiring department must provide evidence that the position is a specialty occupation, requiring a bachelor's degree or higher, and the beneficiary must have the qualifications. 

H-1B status allows for immigrant intent and is suitable for tenure-track and non-tenure-track positions. The total duration for H-1B status is six years, filed in a maximum of three-year increments.    

The Illinois Institute of Technology host department collects information from the prospective H-1B employee and submits the request forms and supporting documents to the International Center. The petition is filed with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services for processing and adjudication with intermediate processing through the U.S. Department of Labor.

H-1B REQUEST HIRING DEPARTMENT FORM DOWNLOAD

BENEFICIARY FORMS AND SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS

Please submit one copy (no staples) of the items below to the International Center.

Processing Times

Processing time for an H-1B petition from when the complete request is received at the international Center to adjudication by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) can take approximately four to five months, with premium processing of more than six months if filed using regular processing. Processing times may increase or decrease depending on the time of year and volume of applications at the International Center and at USCIS. Please see the processing time information for further details including information about the intermediate steps with the U.S. Department of Labor.